GRE

Prepare for GRE: Graduate Record Examination

Test structure and length of the computer-based test

SECTION NUMBER OF QUESTIONS ALLOTTED TIME
Analytical Writing
(One section with two separately timed tasks)

One “Analyze an Issue” task and one “Analyze an Argument” task

30 minutes per task
Verbal Reasoning
(Two sections)
Approximately 20 questions per section 30 minutes per section
Quantitative Reasoning
(Two sections)
Approximately 20 questions per section 35 minutes per section
Unscored Varies Varies

You’ll get a 10-minute break following the third section, and a 1-minute break between the other test sections.

The overall testing time for the computer-based GRE revised General Test is about three hours and 45 minutes, plus short breaks. There are five sections to the revised test. Both the verbal and quantitative sections are adaptive.

  • One Analytical Writing section with two separately timed writing tasks
    1. Analysis of an Issue: 30 minutes.
    2. Analysis of an Argument: 30 minutes.
  • Two Verbal Reasoning sections
    1. Verbal reasoning section: 20 questions – 30 minutes.
    2. Verbal reasoning section: 20 questions – 30 minutes.
  • Two Quantitative Reasoning sections
    1. Quantitative reasoning section: 20 exercises – 35 minutes.
    2. Quantitative reasoning section: 20 exercises – 35 minutes.
  • One unscored section, typically a Verbal Reasoning or Quantitative Reasoning section, that may appear at any point in the computer-based GRE revised General Test

The Analytical Writing section will always be first, while the other five sections may appear in any order.

I. Analytical Writing Section.

Here’s what is new for the Analytical Writing section:

  • For each essay task, you will be given one topic rather than a choice of topics.
  • Tasks are now more specific, and responses will be measured to ensure you can integrate critical thinking and analytical writing by fully addressing the tasks you’re presented.
The revised Analytical Writing section continues to measure your ability to:
  • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively
  • support ideas with relevant reasons and examples
  • examine claims and accompanying evidence
  • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion
  • control the elements of standard written English

II. Verbal Reasoning Section

Verbal Reasoning: No More Antonyms and Analogies. More Focus on Reading.

The Verbal Reasoning measure of the GRE® revised General Test assesses your ability to analyze and evaluate written material and synthesize information obtained from it, analyze relationships among component parts of sentences and recognize relationships among words and concepts.

Verbal Reasoning questions appear in several formats, each of which is discussed in detail in the corresponding sections linked to below. About half of the measure requires you to read passages and answer questions on those passages. The other half requires you to read, interpret and complete existing sentences, groups of sentences or paragraphs.

Verbal Reasoning Question Types

III. Quantitative Reasoning Section

The Quantitative Reasoning measure has four types of questions:

Each question appears either independently as a discrete question or as part of a set of questions called a Data Interpretation set. All of the questions in a Data Interpretation set are based on the same data presented in tables, graphs or other displays of data. You are allowed to use a basic calculator on the Quantitative Reasoning measure. For the computer-based test, the calculator is provided on-screen.

Official GRE site at https://www.ets.org/gre

 

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